Jamie Dimon

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Jamie Dimon

 

 Eyes on the Fed


Why is Jamie Dimon on a Federal Reserve board?
By Annalyn Censky @CNNMoney May 21, 2012: 9:50 AM ET


While serving as the head of JPMorgan Chase, Jamie Dimon has also sat on the New York Fed's board of directors. Seem shady? Blame Congress.
While serving as the head of JPMorgan Chase, Jamie Dimon has also sat on the New York Fed's board of directors. Seem shady? Blame Congress.


NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Is there a conflict of interest when bankers like JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon serve on the board of the same institution that regulates them?

Insiders say no. But critics harp on the central bank for what seems like an incestuous relationship with Wall Street.

Massachusetts Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren called for Dimon's resignation from the New York Fed's board last week, and Sen. Bernie Sanders has used the uproar to promote the idea of overhauling the Federal Reserve.

"The conflicts of interest are so apparent that they're laughable," Sanders told CNN's Wolf Blitzer last week. "Here you have the Fed, which is supposed to regulate Wall Street. Then you have the CEO of the largest Wall Street company on the board which [it] is supposed to be regulating. This is the fox guarding the henhouse."

Dimon served on the New York Fed's board of directors amid the financial crisis. Appointed to the post initially in 2007, he is scheduled to end his second three-year term in December. He is currently the only executive of a major national bank to serve on a regional board.

If it seems shady though, don't blame the Fed. Congress intentionally set the central bank up that way in 1913.

The Federal Reserve Act, which created the central bank, was a controversial measure back then. In a political move designed to get the bill passed, Congress decided to include bankers on the regional boards.

"There was a tremendous amount of opposition. The bankers were terribly offended by the idea that a central bank would regulate them," said Elmus Wicker, professor emeritus at Indiana University, who has written five books about the history of the Fed.

In an attempt to decentralize the institution away from just Washington and New York, the law divided the Fed into 12 regional banks. Each are led by a president and a board of directors with nine members.

The law requires that three of those nine members, dubbed "Class A" directors, are bankers from the region. The other six must represent the public, particularly in the interests of agriculture, commerce, industry, services, labor and consumers.

The central bank's most influential branch is undeniably the New York Fed, which sits just blocks away from Wall Street.

There, Dimon sits on the board along with CEOs from Banco Popular de Puerto Rico and Solvay Bank, a small regional bank based near Syracuse, N.Y. The heads of Macy's (M, Fortune 500), the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Columbia University are also on the board.

The board members typically meet twice a month and are paid a bit for the job -- about $5,000 a year for the chairman and $2,000 for the others. Their responsibilities include overseeing the management of the New York Fed, contributing their insight on the economy, and acting as a link between the government and private sector.

However, they have no say over the Fed's supervisory or regulatory role.

It's "not like a board, it's more of an advisory group," Dimon explained to JPMorgan Chase (JPM, Fortune 500) shareholders at the bank's annual investor meeting in Tampa, Fla. last week. "I am not involved at all in the supervisory side of that."

Related: Senate confirms Obama's Fed nominees

That distinction was not enough to satisfy government investigators last year though, who chided the Federal Reserve's regional banks for failing to clearly document the roles and responsibilities of their directors.

A report by the Government Accountability Office cited a case where then-chairman of the New York Fed's board of directors Stephen Friedman owned shares in Goldman Sachs (GS, Fortune 500) -- one of many banks to benefit from the Wall Street bailouts.

Friedman was granted a waiver in January 2009, but the board was unaware that he had purchased additional shares in Goldman Sachs through an automatic stock purchase program. He later resigned from the board.

While the GAO report did not identify actual conflicts of interest, it indicated the appearance of a conflict could hurt the credibility of the Fed.

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner echoed those concerns last week following the JPMorgan Chase uproar. In an interview with the PBS NewsHour, he admitted that bankers on the board create a public relations nightmare for the central bank.

"The perception is a problem," Geithner told PBS NewsHour. "And it's worth trying to figure out how to fix that." To top of page


First Published: May 21, 2012: 9:41 AM ET


https://money.cnn.com/2012/05/21/news/economy/jamie-dimon-new-york-fed/index.htm


Jamie Dimon Is Not Alone
During the financial crisis, at least 18 former and current directors from Federal Reserve Banks worked in banks and corporations that collectively received over $4 trillion in low-interest loans from the Federal Reserve.
U.S. Senator Bernard Sanders (I-Vt.)
Washington, D.C.
June 12, 2012
1. Jamie Dimon, the Chairman and CEO of JP Morgan Chase, has served on the Board of Directors at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York since 2007. During the financial crisis, the Fed provided JP Morgan Chase with $391 billion in total financial assistance. JP Morgan Chase was also used by the Fed as a clearinghouse for the Fed's emergency lending programs.
In March of 2008, the Fed provided JP Morgan Chase with $29 billion in financing to acquire Bear Stearns. During the financial crisis, the Fed provided JP Morgan Chase with an 18-month exemption from risk-based leverage and capital requirements. The Fed also agreed to take risky mortgage-related assets off of Bear Stearns balance sheet before JP Morgan Chase acquired this troubled investment bank.
2. Jeffrey Immelt, the CEO of General Electric, served on the New York Fed's Board of Directors from 2006-2011. General Electric received $16 billion in low-interest financing from the Federal Reserve’s Commercial Paper Funding Facility during this time period.
3. Stephen Friedman. In 2008, the New York Fed approved an application from Goldman Sachs to become a bank holding company giving it access to cheap Fed loans. During the same period, Friedman, who was chairman of the New York Fed at the time, sat on the Goldman Sachs board of directors and owned Goldman stock, something the Fed’s rules prohibited. He received a waiver in late 2008 that was not made public. After Friedman received the waiver, he continued to purchase stock in Goldman from November 2008 through January of 2009 unbeknownst to the Fed, according to the GAO.
During the financial crisis, Goldman Sachs received $814 billion in total financial assistance from the Fed.
4. Sanford Weill, the former CEO of Citigroup, served on the Fed's Board of Directors in New York in 2006. During the financial crisis, Citigroup received over $2.5 trillion in total financial assistance from the Fed.
5. Richard Fuld, Jr, the former CEO of Lehman Brothers, served on the Fed's Board of Directors in New York from 2006 to 2008. During the financial crisis, the Fed provided $183 billion in total financial assistance to Lehman before it collapsed.
6. James M. Wells, the Chairman and CEO of SunTrust Banks, has served on the Board of Directors at the Federal Reserve Bank in Atlanta since 2008. During the financial crisis, SunTrust received $7.5 billion in total financial assistance from the Fed.
7. Richard Carrion, the head of Popular Inc. in Puerto Rico, has served on the Board of Directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York since 2008. Popular received $1.2 billion in total financing from the Fed's Term Auction Facility during the financial crisis.
8. James Smith, the Chairman and CEO of Webster Bank, served on the Federal Reserve's Board of Directors in Boston from 2008-2010. Webster Bank received $550 million in total financing from the Federal Reserve's Term Auction Facility during the financial crisis.
9. Ted Cecala, the former Chairman and CEO of Wilmington Trust, served on the Fed's Board of Directors in Philadelphia from 2008-2010. Wilmington Trust received $3.2 billion in total financial assistance from the Federal Reserve during the financial crisis.
10. Robert Jones, the President and CEO of Old National Bancorp, has served on the Fed's Board of Directors in St. Louis since 2008. Old National Bancorp received a total of $550 million in low-interest loans from the Federal Reserve's Term Auction Facility during the financial crisis.
11. James Rohr, the Chairman and CEO of PNC Financial Services Group, served on the Fed's Board of Directors in Cleveland from 2008-2010. PNC received $6.5 billion in low-interest loans from the Federal Reserve during the financial crisis.
12. George Fisk, the CEO of LegacyTexas Group, was a director at the Dallas Federal Reserve in 2009. During the financial crisis, his firm received a $5 million low-interest loan from the Federal Reserve's Term Auction Facility.
13. Dennis Kuester, the former CEO of Marshall & Ilsley, served as a board director on the Chicago Federal Reserve from 2007-2008. During the financial crisis, his bank received over $21 billion in low-interest loans from the Fed.
14. George Jones, Jr., the CEO of Texas Capital Bank, has served as a board director at the Dallas Federal Reserve since 2009. During the financial crisis, his bank received $2.3 billion in total financing from the Fed's Term Auction Facility.
15. Douglas Morrison, was the Chief Financial Officer at CitiBank in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, while he served as a board director at the Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank in 2006. During the financial crisis, CitiBank in Sioux Falls, South Dakota received over $21 billion in total financing from the Federal Reserve.
16. L. Phillip Humann, the former CEO of SunTrust Banks, served on the Board of Directors at the Federal Reserve Bank in Atlanta from 2006-2008. During the financial crisis, SunTrust received $7.5 billion in total financial assistance from the Fed.
17. Henry Meyer, III, the former CEO of KeyCorp, served on the Board of Directors at the Federal Reserve Bank in Cleveland from 2006-2007. During the financial crisis, KeyBank (owned by KeyCorp) received over $40 billion in total financing from the Federal Reserve.
18. Ronald Logue, the former CEO of State Street Corporation, served as a board member of the Boston Federal Reserve Bank from 2006-2007. During the financial crisis, State Street Corporation received a total of $42 billion in financing from the Federal Reserve.

https://www.sanders.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/061212DimonIsNotAlone.pdf


Fed Board Member Conflicts Detailed by GAO: Banks and Businesses Took $4 Trillion in Bailouts

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

WASHINGTON, June 12 - More than $4 trillion in near zero-interest Federal Reserve loans and other financial assistance went to the banks and businesses of at least 18 current and former Federal Reserve regional bank directors in the aftermath of the 2008 financial collapse, according to Government Accountability Office records made public for the first time today by Sen. Bernie Sanders.

On the eve of Senate testimony by JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon, Sanders (I-Vt.) released the detailed findings on Dimon and other Fed board members whose banks and businesses benefited from Fed actions.

A Sanders provision in the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act required the Government Accountability Office to investigate potential conflicts of interest. The Oct. 19, 2011 report by the non-partisan investigative arm of Congress laid out the findings, but did not name names. Sanders today released the names.

"This report reveals the inherent conflicts of interest that exist at the Federal Reserve. At a time when small businesses could not get affordable loans to create jobs, the Fed was providing trillions in secret loans to some of the largest banks and corporations in America that were well represented on the boards of the Federal Reserve Banks. These conflicts must end," Sanders said.

The GAO study found that allowing members of the banking industry to both elect and serve on the Federal Reserve's board of directors creates "an appearance of a conflict of interest" and poses "reputational risks" to the Federal Reserve System.

In Dimon's case, JPMorgan received some $391 billion of the $4 trillion in emergency Fed funds at the same time his bank was used by the Fed as a clearinghouse for emergency lending programs. In March of 2008, the Fed provided JPMorgan with $29 billion in financing to acquire Bear Stearns. Dimon also got the Fed to provide JPMorgan Chase with an 18-month exemption from risk-based leverage and capital requirements. And he convinced the Fed to take risky mortgage-related assets off of Bear Stearns balance sheet before JP Morgan Chase acquired the troubled investment bank.

Another high-profile conflict involved Stephen Friedman, the former chairman of the New York Fed's board of directors. Late in 2008, the New York Fed approved an application from Goldman Sachs to become a bank holding company giving it access to cheap loans from the Federal Reserve. During that period, Friedman sat on the Goldman Sachs board. He also owned Goldman stock, something that was prohibited by Federal Reserve conflict of interest regulations. Although it was not publicly disclosed at the time, Friedman received a waiver from the Fed's conflict of interest rules in late 2008. Unbeknownst to the Fed, Friedman continued to purchase shares in Goldman from November 2008 through January of 2009, according to the GAO.

In another case, General Electric CEO Jeffrey Immelt was a New York Fed board member at the same time GE helped create a Commercial Paper Funding Facility during the financial crisis. The Fed later provided $16 billion in financing to GE under this emergency lending program.

Sanders on May 22 introduced legislation to prohibit banking industry and business executives from serving as directors of the 12 Federal Reserve regional banks.

To read a report summarizing the new GAO information, click here.
https://www.sanders.senate.gov/newsroom/press-releases/fed-board-member-conflicts-detailed-by-gao-banks-and-businesses-took-4-trillion-in-bailouts
 

Joe Biden is reportedly considering JPMorgan Chase's Jamie Dimon for a top position in his administration. Here's how the CEO became one of the richest men in banking.


Taylor Nicole Rogers


jamie dimon net worthjamie dimon net worth
A jump in JPMorgan Chase's stock price on Tuesday added millions to the fortune of its CEO, Jamie Dimon. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier


JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon could be on the shortlist for a top position in Joe Biden's administration if Biden is elected president.
The country's largest bank is currently being led by two other executives as Dimon recovers from an emergency heart surgery he underwent on Thursday.
Dimon was paid $115 million in salary alone between 1991 and 2015, Bloomberg reported.
One of the few billionaires in banking, Dimon has a net worth of $1.3 billion, Forbes estimates.
Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.


Bankers at JPMorgan Chase might need to get used to life without Jamie Dimon.

Joe Biden is considering appointing Dimon to a position within his Treasury Department if the former vice president wins the White House in November, Axios reported on Monday. Dimon is currently recovering from emergency heart surgery he had on Thursday.

A pivot to public service would be unprecedented for Dimon, who is one of the most prominent figures in finance. Dimon became one of the few billionaires in banking in 2015, Bloomberg reported at the time.

Representatives of JPMorgan Chase did not respond to Business Insider's request for comment on Dimon's net worth or earnings. They declined to comment regarding speculation that Dimon is being considered for a position in Biden's administration.

Keep reading to learn how Dimon built his billion-dollar fortune.


Dimon, 63, is a native New Yorker.


Jamie Dimon

Jamie Dimon. Getty/Win McNamee

Dimon was born and raised in Queens, New York, Business Insider reported. He has an undergraduate degree from Tufts University and an MBA from Harvard Business School, according to Forbes.

After graduating, Dimon took a job at American Express, where he met his mentor Sandy Weill, according to Bloomberg.


Dimon is credited with helping to invent the megabank.


Jamie Dimon

Jamie Dimon. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez

Dimon followed Weill from American Express to Citigroup, before Weill forced Dimon out of the bank over personal differences in 1998, Bloomberg reported.

During his time at Citigroup, Dimon was tasked with integrating the companies that Weill acquired into the larger bank, Bloomberg reported. Dimon focused on cutting costs, all the while buying stock in the firms he worked with.

Together, Dimon and Weill turned Citigroup into the world's biggest financial-services firm at the time, according to Bloomberg. Dimon later used similar tactics to grow JPMorgan Chase.


Dimon was fired from Citigroup in 1998, but he made $110 million selling the Citi shares he owned.


Citigroup trader Thomas Ferrigno booth NYSE

Citi trader Thomas Ferrigno works in his company's booth on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York City on July 27, 2016. Brendan McDermid/Reuters

Dimon was later named the CEO of Chicago-based Bank One, and joined JPMorgan when it acquired Bank One in 2000, according to Bloomberg. He became the combined company's CEO in 2005.


Dimon was paid $115 million in salary alone between 1991 and 2015, according to Bloomberg.


jamie dimon

Jamie Dimon. Scott Olson/Getty Images

Dimon's employers seem to have gotten a lot of bang for their buck, however. Bloomberg's Hugh Son and Pamela Roux called JPMorgan Chase the "best-run of the universal banks" in 2015. Under Dimon's leadership, it surpassed Bank of America and Citigroup to become America's largest lender, according to Bloomberg.


Dimon is significantly richer than his peers in the banking industry.


Jamie Dimon

Jamie Dimon. Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

He's now estimated to be worth $1.3 billion, according to Forbes.

Dimon joined the three comma club in 2015, Bloomberg reported at the time.

"The odds are much, much lower for a bank CEO becoming a billionaire than a guy going to a hedge fund or private equity," said NYU Stern School of Business professor Roy Smith told Bloomberg. "The real lucre in this business has always been on the transactional side. The CEOs of Wall Street have to deal with litigation, regulation, and the relatively short tenures you have at the top of the pile."

Weill is one of the few other bank executives to become a billionaire, according to Bloomberg.


Chase's CEO spent some of his riches on an apartment on New York's Upper East Side.


jamie dimon nyc apartment 1185 Park Ave

The exterior of Jamie Dimon's apartment building on New York's Upper East Side, as shown on Google Maps Street View. Google Maps

Dimon purchased the Fifth Avenue apartment for $10 million, Vanity Fair reported.

The prewar building boasts a drive-through circular driveway, white-glove service, a concierge, private elevator landings, and 24-hour security guards and doormen, according to Forbes.

Forbes also called the building an "architectural treasure" that is "considered by many the Upper East Side's most distinguished address." It is also home to Travelers Companies CEO Alan Schnitzer and former United Nations diplomat Matthew Niemetz, according to Forbes.


Dimon also owns a "weekend house" in Bedford, New York.


soros ny bomb house gate

The entrance to George Soros' estate in Bedford, New York. Dimon's weekend home is located nearby. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dimon purchased the home in 2004 after finalizing Bank One's merger with JPMorgan Chase, Vanity Fair reported. The house has 10 bedrooms and 10 bathrooms, and sits on 34 acres of land.

"Dimon is perfectly happy spending his two-week vacation there alone, making his own coffee and wandering around the local Target in his jeans," Vanity Fair's Bethany McLean wrote.


Dimon met his wife, Judith Kent Dimon, while they were both students at Harvard.


jamie dimon family

Chairman of Lacoste SA Michel Lacoste, Chairman and CEO of JP Morgan Chase Jamie Dimon, his wife Judith Kent Dimon, their daughter and a friend attend the Lacoste and JP Morgan cocktail at Michel Lacoste's home in Geneva. Stephane Cardinale/Corbis via Getty Images

At the time, Dimon was too poor to pay for their first date, so his future wife footed the tab, according to Money Inc.

They now have three daughters — Laura, Julia, and Kara — according to Vanity Fair.

Dimon had emergency heart surgery on Thursday.


Jamie Dimon

Jamie Dimon. Alex Wroblewski / Stringer/getty images

Dimon suffered an "acute aortic dissection" and had surgery to repair it, JPMorgan Chase said in a memo Thursday. Dimon is expected to make a full recovery, but co-chief operating officers Daniel Pinto and Gordon Smith will lead the bank in Dimon's absence, Business Insider reported.


Dimon may have a new job soon enough, anyway.


joe biden

Democratic presidential hopeful Former Vice President Joe Biden. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Joe Biden is reportedly considering Dimon for a position in the Treasury Department if the former vice president is elected in November, according to Axios. Bank of America vice-chairman Anne Finucane is also on the shortlist for a Treasury position, while Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Biden's former rival for the Democratic presidential nomination) is a rumored contender for Treasury secretary.

Dimon himself has also been repeatedly suggested as a potential presidential candidate in the past, Axios reported.


https://www.businessinsider.com/billionaire-jamie-dimon-jp-morgan-chase-richest-men-in-banking-2020-1

 
JPMorgan Won’t Shun the Fed’s Discount Window Anymore

Move is likely to lessen stigma associated with borrowing directly from central bank

By David Benoit

Feb. 25, 2020 3:23 pm ET


JPMorgan Chase & Co. Chief Executive James Dimon said the bank is open to tapping the Federal Reserve’s rainy-day fund, a move that’s likely to lessen the stigma associated with borrowing directly from the central bank.

The nation’s biggest bank will occasionally tap the Fed’s discount window when it makes business sense to do so, Mr. Dimon said at JPMorgan’s investor day Tuesday. Banks—scarred from the public beating they took during the financial crisis—have all but abandoned the window in recent years to avoid even...

To Read the Full Story

https://www.wsj.com/articles/jpmorgan-wont-shun-the-feds-discount-window-anymore-11582662187

 
Sandy Weill: I Fired Jamie Dimon Because He Wanted To Be CEO

John Carney
Jan 4, 2010, 4:07 PM

Sandy Weill pushed Jamie Dimon out of Citigroup because he was too ambitious.

“The problem was in 1999 he wanted to be C.E.O. and I didn’t want to retire,” Weill told the New York Times. “I regret that it came to that. I don’t know what else could have been done except for him to be more patient.”

It is an extraordinary admission from a man who built one of the largest banks in the world. Weill and Dimon were close business associates and friend for decades, with while in the mentor role to the much younger Dimon. Until Dimon was forced out, many assumed he would be Weil’s successor as head of Citi.

Over the years we’ve heard various explanations for the split. Some said it was Dimon’s reluctance to promote Weil’s daughter. Others have attributed the split to Weill’s jealousy over the media attention Dimon had begun to receive. Still others have said, in whispered voices, that Weil worried Dimon was plotting some kind of coup.

Now we learn from Weill’s own admission that it was his own reluctance to step aside that forced Dimon out. And he blames Dimon for his impatience. Keep in mind that Weill was 66 when Dimon was forced out and he retired just four years later. For the sake of those four years, apparently, the ship of Citi was wrecked.

Fascinatingly, Dimon seems to already be preparing to avoid this mistake. At just 53 years old, he has already promoted a likely successor.

Photo: Roger Ressmeyer/Corbis via New York Magazine


https://www.businessinsider.com/sandy-weil-i-fired-jamie-dimon-because-he-wanted-to-be-ceo-2010-1

The Amazing Life And Career Of Jamie Dimon


Lawrence Delevingne

Dec 15, 2009, 4:21 PM



jamie dimon tony blair bill clinton


President Obama may be calling bankers "fat cats" recently, but there's at least one person on Wall Street who he has a big soft spot for.

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon's favored status in Washington is no secret. His name has been floated as the next Treasury Secretary; he argues against "too big to fail" financial institutions as part of financial reform; and JPMorgan repaid its bailout billions earlier than most. His bank even seems to have dodged the sub-prime bullet.

Heck, Dimon flew to the White House on a private jet this week and didn't catch any flack.

But how did a brash banker who made $8.5 million the same year his firm took $25 billion in bailouts gain national prominence and a sterling reputation? And during a crisis that claimed the careers or tarnished the reputations of most of his peers?

It's been quite journey. From being born into a family of bankers to excelling at Harvard Business School to a meteoric rise -- and ultimate split -- with mentor Sandy Weill at what would become Citigroup, Jamie Dimon has enjoyed stunning success in his career, if not using the most conventional Wall Street track.

See the life and rise of Jamie Dimon>>>

Image: Dimon's high school senior yearbook page, via Gawker


Childhood home

jamie dimon


Dimon is born on March 13, 1956, with fraternal twin Ted Jr. The twins and their older brother Peter (b. 1954) spend their earliest days in this modest East Williston, Long Island home, according to Last Man Standing, a biography published this year by Duff McDonald.

Image: Last Man Standing

Banking in his blood

Jamie's parents Ted and Themis Dimon pictured here in 1962. Ted is a stockbroker at Shearson Hammill in New York City, the same firm as his father (Jamie's grandfather), Panos Papademetriou, a Greek immigrant, according to Last Man Standing

Themis is also the child of Greek immigrants.

Image: Last Man Standing

Grade school in Queens

Dimon goes to public school -- PS 69 -- in Jackson Heights, Queens from kindergarten to fifth grade after his family moves to the neighborhood, according to Last Man Standing.

The family later moves to Park Avenue on Manhattans' exclusive upper east side.

Image: Dimon with the family sheltie, Chippy, from Last Man Standing

Athlete, ladies man

Dimon attends Browning, a private, all-boys New York City high school. Dimon plays varsity soccer, basketball and baseball; one of his nicknames is "Mad Dog," according to Last Man Standing.

Dimon is also reportedly a ladies man. "In senior year, he majored in his girlfriend," says a friend in Last Man Standing.

On a recent evening trip to the Upper East Side with some JPM collegues, Dimon enthusiastically pointed out of the window at the car to his old school.

Image: Last Man Standing


Goes to Tufts

Rejected by top-choice Brown, Dimon goes to Tufts, majoring in psychology and economics, according to Last Man Standing.

Image: Dimon's high school senior yearbook page, via Gawker



Enter the mentor

sandyweill



Dimon's parents become close socially with Joan and Sandy Weill through business involving both men.

Dimon leverages a thesis he wrote about a business deal involving his father and Weill into a summer job at Hayden Stone, then the financier's acquisition vehicle, according to Last Man Standing.

Stint in Boston

faneuil hall boston

Dimon works for two years after graduating Tufts summa cum laude at Management Advisory and Consulting in Boston, according to Last Man Standing.

Image: Boston's Faneuil Hall, via Wikipedia


Harvard MBA

Dimon begins Harvard Business School in 1980 in the same class as Jeff Immelt of GE and hedge fund managers Seth Klarman and Steven Mandel, according to Last Man Standing.

Dimon also meets his future wife in the program, Judy Kent.

Says Jeff Immelt of the meeting: "Judy was by far the best-looking, sexiest, and smartest girl in the class, and Jamie got to her first. That's about it," according to Last Man Standing.

The couple now have three daughters together.

Image: Dimon and Kent at HBS, from Last Man Standing


The ascent begins

Graduating a prestigious Baker Scholar from HBS, Dimon turns down offers from Goldman Sachs, Lehman Brothers and Morgan Stanley to join mentor Sandy Weill at American Express as his assistant, according to Last Man Standing.

Photo: Roger Ressmeyer/Corbis via New York Magazine



Commercial Credit

Dimon and Weill leave American Express together to run Commercial Credit, a Baltimore-based sub-prime lender. Together, they build it into the Citigroup empire.

As Duff McDonald summarizes in New York:

"Virtually by themselves, he and Dimon started over from the bottom, commandeering a third-tier Baltimore lending outfit called Commercial Credit. From there, like banking marauders, they pulled off an audacious string of acquisitions that culminated in the takeover of Citicorp. For a decade and a half, side by side, they built an empire, the world’s first financial supermarket."

Image: Last Man Standing


Leadership experience grows

Dimon's rise alongside Weill while Commercial Credit goes from small-time to Citigroup includes diverse leadership positions at various acquired companies (via Encyclopedia of Business):

Commercial Credit Group, 1986–1989, executive vice president and CFO; 1989–1991, president and CFO; Primerica Corporation, 1991–1993, president and CFO; Smith Barney, 1990–1993, chief administrative officer; 1993–1995, COO; 1996–1997, chairman and CEO; Salomon Smith Barney Holdings, 1997–1998, co-chairman and co-CEO; Citigroup, 1998, president.

Image: Last Man Standing


Break with Weill

After growing hostility between Dimon and Weill, Dimon is fired from Citigroup in November 1998.

Once seen as the obvious successor to his mentor, Dimon and Weill begin butting heads, in particular about Dimon's lack of power at the newly formed Citigroup, when Travelers' merged with Citicorp, according to Last Man Standing.

Bad blood also arises because of professional tensions between Dimon and Weill's daughter, Jessica Bibliowicz, then both at Travelers', according to BusinessWeek. Both leave.


Leads Bank One



jamie dimon william harrison



Dimons next gig comes as CEO of Bank One, beginning in March 2000.

In four years at Bank One, Dimon doubles the value of the company and makes it a "very attractive acquisition target," according to Duff McDonald in New York.

Dimon persuades JPMorgan Chase CEO chief William Harrison (pictured here) to purchase Bank One for $58 billion, making shareholders very happy.


The JPMorgan years


dimon fortune


Dimon is appointed President and COO upon joining JPMorgan Chase in July 2004. He becomes CEO in December 2005.

Called "the toughest guy on Wall Street" by Fortune, Dimon takes "a shot at the title of world's most important banker and [tries] to whip a sprawling financial conglomerate into shape," as the magazine's Shawn Tully wrote in March 2006.

The survivor

dimon fortune jpmorgan


Perhaps his greatest triumph, Dimon helps JPMorgan dodge the subprime bullet.

As Fortune's Shawn Tully put it: "Dimon and his team are on top today because they took a daring stance at the height of the credit bubble. J.P. Morgan mostly exited the business of securitizing subprime mortgages when it was still booming, shunning now notorious instruments such as SIVs (structured investment vehicles) and CDOs (collateralized debt obligations)."

Thanks to that and other sharp moves, Dimon and JPMorgan weather the financial crisis better than any other large bank.

The Bear Stearns firesale


dimon bear

The Ben Bernanke-brokered Bear Stearns firesale to JPMorgan -- initially at just $2 a share -- solidified the bank and its CEO place on top a radically-changed Wall Street.

Called "the best deal ever," JPMorgan spent just $260 million for Bear, whose last reported net worth was $11.7 billion (the price was later increased to $10 a share).


Grabs Washington Mutual

wamuclosing.jpg

Dimon adds to JPMorgan's dominant banking status by aquiring troubled bank Washington Mutual, the country's largest savings and loan.

Regulators broker the sale of WaMu for $1.9 billion, which gives JPMorgan more coveted retail branches nationwide and makes it the biggest bank in America.


Repays TARP

JamieDimon-1009-1

JPMorgan repays its $25 billion in TARP bailout money early in June 2009, earning kudos.


Rises on national stage

jamiedimon tbi

A Democratic-donor, Dimon's strong post-financial crisis reputation attacts national attention.

Dimon is Obama's favorite banker and one of Wall Street's only credible voices in Washington. He argues against "too big to fail" financial institutions and supports many of Washington's efforts.

"If some unforeseen circumstance should put this firm at risk of collapse, I believe we should be allowed to fail," Dimon wrote in The Washington Post this November. "Global economic growth requires the services of big financial firms. It also requires that big financial firms be allowed to fail."


Planning his exit?

jamie dimon obama barack

Dimon's name is floated as a potential successor to Timothy Geithner as Treasury Secretary.

Adding to the speculation, he appoints Jes Staley, head of JPMorgan’s asset management group, to become head of the investment banking unit. That’s read as putting Staley in direct line of succession to run the bank after Dimon.

What's next?

JamieDimon-1009-3

So what's next for Dimon?

While he is only 53 years old, Dimon does not want to run the bank until his grave. In fact, some close to him have said that Dimon’s exit might come sooner than expected by outsiders. He’s a very wealthy man who currently enjoys perhaps the best reputation of any CEO in America.

Dimon's wife told Last Man Standing author McDonald that Dimon fantasizes about opening his own restaurant and turning himself into Sam Malone of Cheers. Dimon says one thing he won't do is just retire and play golf.

Of course, the exit could be sped up if Dimon got a call from Obama to be the Treasury Secretary to lead America into the recovery.


https://www.businessinsider.com/jamie-dimon-awesome-life-2009-12

Putting Obama on Hold, in a Hint of Who’s Boss

By ANDREW ROSS SORKINDEC. 14, 2009

President Obama didn’t exactly look thrilled as he stared at the Polycom speakerphone in front of him. “Well, I appreciate you guys calling in,” he began the meeting at the White House with Wall Street’s top brass on Monday.

He was, of course, referring to the three conspicuously absent attendees who were being piped in by telephone: Lloyd C. Blankfein, the chief executive of Goldman Sachs; John J. Mack, chairman of Morgan Stanley; and Richard D. Parsons, chairman of Citigroup.

Their excuse? “Inclement weather,” according to the White House. More precisely, fog delayed flights into Reagan National Airport. (In the “no good deed goes unpunished” category, the absent bankers were at least self-aware enough to try to fly commercial.)

That awkward moment on speakerphone in the White House, for better or worse, spoke volumes about how the balance of power between Wall Street and Washington has shifted again, back in Wall Street’s favor.

Now that Citigroup has given back its bailout money — and Wells Fargo announced late on Monday that it would, too — whatever leverage Washington had over the financial services industry seems to be quickly eroding.

Obama Presses Giant Banks to Make More Loans DEC. 14, 2009

Executive compensation, leverage limits and lending standards were all issues that Washington said it planned to change — and when the taxpayers were the shareholders of these firms, it probably could have done so. But now the White House has been left in the position of extending invitations, rather than exercising its clout. And in the figurative and literal sense, it is getting stood up.

Those who attended the meeting — Jamie Dimon of JPMorgan flew down on a private jet and didn’t take any heat for it — seemed to talk a good game, but even President Obama acknowledged they might have been just toying with him.

“The problem is there’s a big gap between what I’m hearing here in the White House and the activities of lobbyists on behalf of these institutions or associations of which they’re a member up on Capitol Hill,” he said after the discussion.

Are we making too much of this meeting and its grounded attendees?

The meeting was always just going to be political theater. Wall Street bankers were supposed to play their part on the public stage in Washington, and submit to a scolding from the president about bonuses and the need to start lending more to help get the economy moving.

But inevitably public perception will issue its harsh ruling, and it goes something like this: If the meeting were really that important to Mr. Blankfein, Mr. Mack and Mr. Parsons, they would have found a way to get there.
Photo

President Obama on Monday. His words about Wall Street might not be having the intended impact these days. Credit Doug Mills/The New York Times

They would have left the night before, or they would have flown out at the crack of dawn, or better yet, taken Amtrak (I called customer service, and the Acela was running only a couple of minutes late).

In fairness, there is little question that they wanted to be there and seemed genuinely disappointed they couldn’t make it. (You could hear it in Mr. Mack and Mr. Blankfein’s voice when they got on the call. “Mr. President, we’re upset we’re not able to be there, but we’re on line with you now,” Mr. Mack said. “It’s certainly not for a lack of effort,” Mr. Blankfein quickly followed up.)

But this missed meeting clearly didn’t help their case.

After all, they sure hoofed it down there last year, when Henry M. Paulson Jr. ordered them to meet him in Washington with less than 24 hours of notice. Most of them got there early, and went home with $10 billion to $25 billion of taxpayer money.

Upon hearing the news Monday morning of the airplane delays, Mark Haines, an anchor at CNBC, went on the air and, in a Howard Beale moment, said what many Americans were probably thinking: “These guys are such little girls! Give me a break. What a bunch of wimps! Thanks for all that taxpayer money ... and, ah, gee, there are delays at the airport!”

But extra effort may have been a lot to ask given the blasting headwinds they were flying into down in Washington.

President Obama’s “60 Minutes” interview Sunday night eviscerating Wall Street laid down the not-so-welcome mat. “I did not run for office to be helping out a bunch of fat-cat bankers,” he said.

Inside the Obama administration, there were bruised feelings about the need for a conference call to have a meeting.

“It was pretty nervy,” one staff member told me.

That’s not to say that Mr. Blankfein, Mr. Mack and Mr. Parsons have not been trying to be constructive.

Mr. Mack has been particularly outspoken about the need for serious financial reform on Wall Street. Mr. Parsons, too, has been trying to act as a liaison with Washington and has not pushed back on legislation.

And Mr. Blankfein, who is under perhaps the hottest spotlight, has been saying many of the right things, though he probably can’t say enough of them at the moment.

But as President Obama has said, it is not what those leaders say to him that really matters.

“The way I see it, having recovered with the help of the American government and the American taxpayers, our banks now have a greater obligation to the goal of a wider recovery, a more stable system, and more broadly shared prosperity,” Mr. Obama said.

There’s an expression that many bankers already know, and might want to keep in mind if they are summoned to Washington again. The saying is often trotted out on Wall Street when people need to be reminded of the importance of getting on a plane and seeing a client: “You can’t fax a handshake.”

The latest news on mergers and acquisitions can be found at nytimes.com/dealbook.

A version of this article appears in print on December 15, 2009, on Page B1 of the New York edition with the headline: Putting Obama on Hold, In a Hint of Who’s Boss. Order Reprints| Today's Paper|Subscribe


https://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/15/business/15sorkin.html?_r=1&ref=business

 

Meet Jamie Dimon's Twin Teddy (Who Knew?)

Katya Wachtel

Dec 1, 2010, 2:01 PM

teddy dimon


How did we not know this - Jamie Dimon is a twin.

In today's New York Times profile of the JP Morgan CEO, we find out that Jamie is part of a fraternal twosome. His brother, Theodore, aka Teddy, was named after their father.

Jamie could not be more different from his bro; Teddy is a sort of holistic professor, specializing in a method called the Alexander Technique.


For those who may be unfamiliar, with this Alexander Technique thing, it is,

"A way to feel better, and move in a more relaxed and comfortable way... the way nature intended. 

An Alexander Technique teacher helps you to identify and lose the harmful habits you have built up over a lifetime of stress and learn to move more freely.

 The Alexander Technique is for you if you are ready to feel more comfortable in your own body."

So he's basically a self-help guru (with a couple of Harvard degrees).

He's authored several books with totally un-greedy, non-capitalistic, un-banker-like names like "The Undivided Self," "Anatomy of the Moving Body," and "The Elements of Skill."


So if you were, for example, to shell out $6 on Ted's article, “Alexander Technique and the Voice: Understanding the Whispered Ah,” you would be taken on a journey through the art of breathing and smiling, and using the silent word "Ah."

Breathing, voice use and the whispered “ah” introduced for people who are already familiar with the Technique. The anatomy of breathing and voice production is explained as are the reasons for practicing the whispered “ah.” Controlled exhalation, the smile and some hints as to the correct sound of the “ah” are also described.

Teddy is the director of the Dimon Institute in New York City and teaches and lectures internationally. Like Jamie, Ted is a Harvard grad. But instead of the Business School, he earned a master’s and doctorate in education.

In the NY Times article, Teddy describes Jamie as being superconfident when they were kids - a "sibling who always wanted the ball when the game was on the line." A good thing for Ted, as Jamie "used to stand up to bullies who threatened his smaller twin."


Was anyone else secretly hoping Dimon had an *evil* twin?


https://www.businessinsider.com/teddy-dimon-jamie-dimon-2010-12

  1. THE DIMON INSTITUTE
    https://www.dimoninstitute.org/faculty
    https://www.dimoninstitute.org/
     

    Theodore Dimon, Wall Street Broker and Father of J.P. Morgan CEO, Dies at 85

    The senior Mr. Dimon’s career in finance had an impact on his son James Dimon


    Theodore Dimon and his wife Themis at a Shearson event at the Greenbrier resort in West Virginia on April 29, 1988. Mr. Dimon died on June 5 and his wife passed away a day later. Photo: The Greenbrier Photo studio
    .

    By Emily Glazer

    June 10, 2016 6:07 pm ET

    Veteran Wall Street broker Theodore Dimon, father of J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. Chairman and Chief Executive James Dimon, died on June 5 after battling cancer.

    Known as Ted Sr. to his family, he passed at the age of 85, continuing to work in the office until a few months before his death. While Ted Dimon worked at J.P. Morgan for the last several years, he and his son Jamie had agreed he reported to himself.


    The senior Mr. Dimon’s career in finance had an impact on Jamie, one of three sons. “Dimon later said that he learned a great deal about the brokerage industry ‘across the kitchen table,’” according to “Last Man Standing,” a biography of Jamie by Duff McDonald. They also shared a love of list-making.

    Ted Dimon became a stockbroker at Shearson Hammill in 1953, initially as an assistant for his father, a year after his marriage to Themis Anastasia Kalos. Both were children of Greek immigrants. Themis, his wife of 65 years, also battled cancer and died just a day after her husband on June 6 at 84 years old.

    Ted Dimon initially commuted to Shearson Hammill’s offices on 44th Street and Fifth Avenue in New York from East Williston, Long Island, in a gray convertible Dodge. The family later moved to Jackson Heights, Queens.

    The elder Mr. Dimon, known for dressing sharply in striped shirts paired with a bold tie picked out by his wife many mornings, survived many of the mergers and acquisitions that washed over Wall Street. He eventually found himself working for financier Sandy Weill. Ted and Themis became close with Mr. Weill and his wife Joan, ultimately introducing Jamie to the former bank titan.

    Ted Dimon made an impression on Mr. Weill. “Joanie and I liked that Ted didn’t seem like the typical broker—he was intellectual and enjoyed a talent for playing the violin—while Themis was warm and never put on airs,” according to Sandy Weill’s autobiography “The Real Deal.”

    Ted Dimon sometimes played in a quartet with others in the industry after work, said Leslie Schwartz, who worked with him for 34 years, adding that he also ran around the reservoir in Central Park. The elder Mr. Dimon also served on the board of the Orchestra of St. Luke’s society and the School for Strings and provided pro-bono financial advice to nonprofits.

    Jamie Dimon became his father’s boss soon after Shearson was acquired by citigroup Inc. predecessor Primerica, which had a retail brokerage business: Smith Barney. Jamie Dimon became chairman and CEO of Smith Barney in January 1996. He confirmed years ago that his father “still considered himself a free agent, that ‘he would never say I was his boss,’” according to “Last Man Standing.”

    Ted Dimon stayed on at what would become Citigroup for several years even after Jamie left in 1998. In 2006, Ted Dimon moved to Merrill Lynch, and in November 2009, at 78 years old, he joined the brokerage unit of J.P. Morgan with three other brokers, all women who have worked with him for more than 20 years.

    Two of his most important principles were investing for the long term and being bullish on America, said Ms. Schwartz.

    “When Ted started, there were no desktops; the way you got your information was very different...even years later he insisted on having the ticker tape along his computer,” Ms. Schwartz said. “This business was his lifeblood.”

    Ted and Themis Dimon are survived by Themis’s sister, Olga; their children Peter, Ted Jr. and his wife Tamara, James and his wife Judy; their grandchildren Julia and her husband Joey, Laura, Kara and her fiancé Conor; and their great grandchild Caroline.

    Write to Emily Glazer at emily.glazer@wsj.com

    Copyright ©2019 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8

    Appeared in the June 11, 2016, print edition as 'Theodore Dimon, Wall Street Broker, Dies.'


    Copyright ©2019 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/theodore-dimon-wall-street-broker-and-father-of-j-p-morgan-ceo-dies-at-85-1465596456


    Ted and Themis Dimon: Together in Life, Together in Love, Together in Death

    June 13, 2016

    For 65 years, Ted and Themis Dimon had the kind of relationship poems and plays and movies were written about, requiring suspension of disbelief because it was so unbelievable. But true.

    Children of Greek immigrants, he became one of the most successful Wall Street brokers, staying at the job until 85, almost until he died from cancer on June 5 – in the arms of his wife, who died 22 hours later the next day, at 84. Their family was with them.

    His was a prominent name in New York and in financial circles, for his own career and as the father of J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. Chairman and Chief Executive James Dimon, who said he learned about the arcane business from the source – his dad.

    Dimon later said that he learned a great deal about the brokerage industry ‘across the kitchen table,’” according to Last Man Standing, a biography of Jamie by Duff McDonald. They also shared a love of list-making.

    Ted Dimon became a stockbroker at Shearson Hammill in 1953, initially as an assistant for his father, a year after his marriage to Themis Anastasia Kalos, taking their homeland with them too.

    The second son of Panos Dimon (Papademitrou), an emigre from Smyrna, Turkey and Theonia Mylonas, Ted was born on January 3, 1931 and grew up in New York City.

    He learned the financial ropes fast and became a well-known advisor, even dispensing his expertise for free to non-profit organizations, and for having built a team that stayed with him for many years.

    He also served as a Trustee on the Board of the St Luke’s Orchestra Society and the School for Strings.

    Themis Anastasia Kalos was born on August 26, 1931, the third daughter of Jimmy Kalos and Iphegnia Smyrnis, both emigres from the Greek Peloponnese.

    When her children left for college, Themis completed her Bachelor’s degree at New School and earned her Master’s degree in Psychology at Teachers College.

    She volunteered at a pre-school program and served on several boards, including SCAN and the New York Psychoanalytic Institute Foundation.

    COMMUTING TO WORK

    Ted worked at J.P. Morgan for the last several years where his son was boss but they agreed Ted reported to himself.

    He had come up the ranks with the humility of his heritage, commuting to Shearson Hammill’s office on 44th Street and Fifth Avenue from East Williston, Long Island in a gray convertible Dodge, the Wall Street Journal reported in a feature obituary of his life. The family moved to Jackson Heights, Queens, instead of picking the tonier place of Manhattan.

    Ted Dimon looked in place on Wall Street, dressing impeccably in striped shirts paired with a bold tie picked out by his wife many mornings, survived many of the mergers and acquisitions that washed over Wall Street, the paper reported.

    He eventually found himself working for financier Sandy Weill. Ted and Themis became close with Weill and his wife Joan, ultimately introducing Jamie to the former bank titan.

    Ted Dimon made an impression on Weill. “Joanie and I liked that Ted didn’t seem like the typical broker—he was intellectual and enjoyed a talent for playing the violin—while Themis was warm and never put on airs,” according to Sandy Weill’s autobiography The Real Deal.

    Dimon sometimes played in a quartet with others in the industry after work, Leslie Schwartz, who worked with him for 34 years told the Journal, adding that he also ran around the reservoir in Central Park.

    LIKE FATHER …

    Jamie Dimon became his father’s boss soon after Shearson was acquired by Citigroup Inc. predecessor Primerica, which had a retail brokerage business: Smith Barney.

    Jamie Dimon became Chairman and CEO of Smith Barney in January 1996. The younger Dimon said of his father: “he would never say I was his boss,’” according to the biography.

    Ted Dimon stayed on at what would become Citigroup for several years even after Jamie left in 1998. In 2006, Ted Dimon moved to Merrill Lynch, and in November 2009, at 78 years old, he joined the brokerage unit of J.P. Morgan with three other brokers, all women who have worked with him for more than 20 years.

    Schwarz said Ted Dimon went for the long-term and was bullish on America. “When Ted started, there were no desktops; the way you got your information was very different … even years later he insisted on having the ticker tape along his computer,” she told the paper. “This business was his lifeblood.”

    Besides Jamie and his wife Judy, they are survived by Themis’ sister, Olga; children Peter, Ted Jr. and his wife Tamara; their grandchildren Julia and her husband Joey, Laura, Kara and her fiance, Conor; and their great grandchild Caroline.


    1 Comment


    Ken kates says:

    June 23, 2016 at 8:33 am


    Dear family…
    We were so sorry to hear about your double loss. It is also a loss for us at 2780. Ted and Themis were a wonderful, bright couple, and they will be missed. Ken Kates, Vice President at Ambassador II

    https://www.thenationalherald.com/127157/ted-and-themis-dimon-together-in-life-together-in-love-together-in-death/




    CEOS
    Jamie Dimon shares the secret to his successful career

    Published Tue, Aug 8 2017•2:21 PM EDT|Updated Tue, Aug 8 2017•2:39 PM EDT
    Berkeley Lovelace Jr.@/in/berkeleylovelace@BerkeleyJr


    Key Points

    JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon says the secret to his successful career was putting family first and taking care of his well-being outside of work.
    "I've always said family first, country second, JPMorgan literally last," the CEO tells CNBC.
    Dimon said the worst time of his life was the weekend Lehman Brothers went bankrupt in 2008.

    VIDEO01:39

    JPMorgan chief Jamie Dimon drops advice on how to achieve a fulfilling life


    JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon says the secret to his successful career is putting family first and taking care of his well-being outside of work.

    Dimon, speaking in a wide-ranging interview with CNBC on Tuesday, said when his parents passed away recently, he relied on the support of close family members.


    "I always tell people at JPMorgan Chase: You've got to take care of your friends, your family, your spirit, your mind, your body, your soul, otherwise you won't have a fulfilling life, and those are important," Dimon said on CNBC's "Squawk Alley."

    "Without your family and the support of your family and what you learn from them in the good times and the tough times ... you may not have a great life," he added.

    Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan Chase

    Mark Urban | CNBC


    Dimon, a graduate of Harvard Business School, became chief executive of the world's most valuable bank by market capitalization in 2005. He previously served as CEO of Bank One before JPMorgan bought it in July 2004.

    In 1998, Dimon was fired by former Citigroup chairman and CEO Sandy Weill, abruptly ending a 15-year partnership that saw them build a financial services empire like no other at the time.

    Dimon said the worst time of his life was the weekend Lehman Brothers went bankrupt in 2008, an event which intensified the global financial crisis.


    "I called up my management team and my board of directors, both on Friday night and Saturday night the weekend that Lehman is going bankrupt, and told them that you were going to have the worst, scariest week that you've ever seen in the financial markets or the financial system in the United States and that JPMorgan will do everything we can to help our country," Dimon said.

    "People would expect me to say the 'London Whale' [was the worst]. Not even close," he said.

    In 2012, JPMorgan derivatives traders Javier Martin-Artajo and Julien Grout were accused of hiding hundreds of millions of dollars of losses within JPMorgan's chief investment office in London by marking positions in a credit derivatives portfolio at inflated prices. The U.S. charged the traders but later decided to drop it. The "London Whale" case lost JPMorgan nearly $6.2 billion.

    "It was painful for the company, and I was quite worried about that because it hurts the people in the company. We are flesh and blood," he said.

    Dimon said he enjoys his work, that it's important in having a fulfilling life.

    "I've always said family first, country second, JPMorgan literally last," Dimon said. "JPMorgan is the best I can do for my country. And my family — I spend a lot of time with them."


    Jeffrey Epstein friend and alleged madam Ghislaine Maxwell under FBI investigation

    https://www.cnbc.com/2017/08/08/jamie-dimon-shares-the-secret-to-his-successful-career.html

James Dimon: November 1998-March 2000—private investor; October-November 1998—President, Citigroup Inc., and Chairman and Co-Chief Executive Officer of Citigroup subsidiary Salomon Smith Barney Holdings, Inc.; November 1993-October 1998—President and Chief Operating Officer, Travelers Group, as well as executive positions with Travelers’ subsidiaries Smith Barney, Inc. and Salomon Smith Barney Holdings, Inc. during that period. \

James Dimon (47)
Director, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer (3/27/00)

https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1067092/000095012304002032/y93477e10vk.htm 


Officer/Registered Agent Name List


Officer/RA Name      Entity Name      Entity Number

DIMON, JAMES SALOMON SMITH BARNEY INC. 819132
DIMON, JAMES SALOMON BROTHERS INC. 850668
DIMON , JAMES JPMORGAN CHASE & CO. F02000006289
DIMON, JAMES FINANCE ONE CORPORATION P03593


Detail by Officer/Registered Agent Name


Foreign Profit Corporation

JPMORGAN CHASE & CO.


Filing Information

Document Number
F02000006289
FEI/EIN Number
13-2624428
Date Filed
12/18/2002
State
DE
Status
ACTIVE
Last Event
REINSTATEMENT
Event Date Filed
01/23/2009


Principal Address

383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Changed: 04/11/2019

Mailing Address

383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Changed: 04/11/2019


Registered Agent Name & Address
C T CORPORATION SYSTEM
1200 SOUTH PINE ISLAND ROAD
PLANTATION, FL 33324



Officer/Director Detail
Name & Address

Title Assistant Corporate Secretary

Reddish, Carin Sue
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title CEO, Corporate & Investment Bank and President

Pinto, Daniel Eduardo
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title Assistant Corporate Secretary

Gillis, David Keith Finley
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title CEO, Commercial Banking

Petno , Douglas B
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title CEO, Consumer & Community Banking and President

Smith, Gordon A
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title Assistant Corporate Secretary

Hui, Hayden Yat Yuen
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title Assistant Corporate Secretary

Youngwood, Holly Kennard
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title Assistant Corporate Secretary

Caracciolo , Irma R
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and Director

Dimon , James
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title Assistant Corporate Secretary

Lipman, Jeffrey
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title Assistant Corporate Secretary

Corey, Joanna Isabel Palacios
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title Treasurer

Horner , John S
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title Assistant Corporate Secretary

Castro, Marcela
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title Assistant Corporate Secretary

Brosnan , Mary C
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title CEO, Asset & Wealth Management

Erdoes, Mary E
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title Secretary

Carpenter, Molly
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title Controller

Giles, Nicole Megan
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title Assistant Corporate Secretary

Oakley-White, Olivier Philip
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179


Title Assistant Corporate Secretary

Grant, Stephen Barrett
383 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10179




Annual Reports

Report Year Filed Date
2017 04/20/2017
2018 04/13/2018
2019 04/11/2019



Document Images

04/11/2019 -- ANNUAL REPORT View image in PDF format
04/13/2018 -- ANNUAL REPORT View image in PDF format
04/20/2017 -- ANNUAL REPORT View image in PDF format
04/20/2016 -- ANNUAL REPORT View image in PDF format
04/20/2015 -- ANNUAL REPORT View image in PDF format
04/30/2014 -- ANNUAL REPORT View image in PDF format
04/16/2013 -- ANNUAL REPORT View image in PDF format
04/17/2012 -- ANNUAL REPORT View image in PDF format
03/02/2011 -- ANNUAL REPORT View image in PDF format
04/22/2010 -- ANNUAL REPORT View image in PDF format
01/23/2009 -- Reinstatement View image in PDF format
06/07/2007 -- REINSTATEMENT View image in PDF format
10/07/2005 -- REINSTATEMENT View image in PDF format
08/12/2005 -- Name Change View image in PDF format
11/29/2004 -- REINSTATEMENT View image in PDF format
12/18/2002 -- Foreign Profit View image in PDF format





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Events

JPMORGAN CHASE & CO.

Document Number F02000006289
Date Filed 12/18/2002
Effective Date None
Status Active



Event Type

Filed Date

Effective Date

Description

NAME CHANGE AMENDMENT 08/12/2005 OLD NAME WAS : J.P. MORGAN CHASE & CO.

http://search.sunbiz.org/Inquiry/CorporationSearch/NameHistory?aggregateId=forp-f02000006289-0b105493-98e6-41ae-8bb5-78f6b9f0c65e&entityId=F02000006289&CurrentPage=0&SearchTerm=dimon%20james&InquiryType=OfficerRegisteredAgentName&inquiryDirectionType=CurrentList&SearchNameOrder=DIMONJAMES%20F0200000628950&ListNameOrder=DIMONJAMES%208191323


J.P. Morgan Chase & company J.P. Morgan JPMorgam JM Morgan

2002 2004


Detail by Officer/Registered Agent Name


Foreign Profit Corporation

SALOMON BROTHERS INC.


Filing Information

Document Number
850668
FEI/EIN Number
13-3082694
Date Filed
10/12/1981
State
DE
Status
INACTIVE
Last Event
WITHDRAWAL
Event Date Filed
09/08/1998
Event Effective Date
NONE


Principal Address

ATTN; GENERAL COUNSEL
388 GREENWICH STREET
NEW YORK, NY 10013
Changed: 09/08/1998

Mailing Address

ATTN; GENERAL COUNSEL
388 GREENWICH STREET
NEW YORK, NY 10013
Changed: 09/08/1998


Registered Agent Name & Address
NONE

Officer/Director Detail
Name & Address

Title CD

MAUGHAN, DERYCK C
7 WORLD TRADE CENTER
NEW YORK, NY


Title D

DIMON, JAMES
388 GREENWICH STREET
NEW YORK, NY 10013


Title S

MUNDHEIM, ROBERT
7 WORLD TRADE CENTER
NEW YORK, NY


Title T

JASPER, THOMAS W.
7 WORLD TRADE CENTER
NEW YORK, NY


Title AT

SCHWARTZ, THOMAS
7 WORLD TRADE CENTER
NEW YORK, NY 10048


Title AS

SNOW, ZACHARY
7 WORLD TRADE CTR.
NEW YORK, NY

Annual Reports

Report Year Filed Date
1996 05/01/1996
1997 05/07/1997
1998 05/12/1998

Document Images

09/08/1998 -- Withdrawal View image in PDF format
05/12/1998 -- ANNUAL REPORT View image in PDF format
05/07/1997 -- ANNUAL REPORT View image in PDF format
05/01/1996 -- ANNUAL REPORT View image in PDF format
05/01/1995 -- ANNUAL REPORT View image in PDF format

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Events

FINANCE ONE CORPORATION

Document Number P03593
Date Filed 10/04/1984
Effective Date None
Status Inactive

Event Type         Filed Date        Effective Date      Description

NAME CHANGE AMENDMENT 05/10/1994 OLD NAME WAS : BANC ONE CREDIT CORPORATION


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Jamie Dimon is one of most popular business executives of United States of America. He is currently serving as the president, Chief Executive Officer and chairman of JP Morgan Chase which is the largest of all the four big American Banks. Prior to this, he was the part of Board of Directors of Federal Reserve Bank of New York. He also appeared in the Time’s “lists of the world’s 100 most influential people” several times i.e 2006, 2008, 2009, and 2011.

Early Life

Jamie Dimon

Jamie Dimon was born on 13th December 1956 in New York City, United States. After completing his school education from Browning School, Jamie Dimon joined the Tufts University. He earned his graduation degree in psychology and economics. After completing his graduation degree, Jamie joined a management consulting firm. He served the firm for two years and thereafter attended the Harvard Business School. He did his summer internship from Goldman Sachs while studying in Harvard. In the year 1982, he earned the degree of Master of Business Administration and was bestowed with the title of Baker Scholar. After gaining his master’s degree he got job offers from Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, and Lehman Brothers but he was convinced by Sandy Weill to join the American Express as an assistant.

Family

Parents and Grandparents

Jamie Dimon Parents

Jamie was born to Theodore Dimon and Themis Dimon. His father served American Express as an executive vice president. His paternal grandfather, who served as a banker in Athens, was an immigrant from Greece. He later changed his surname from Papademetriou to Dimon in order to give a French appeal. Both his grandfather and father served as stockbrokers in Shearson.

Siblings and Cousins

As per media reports, Jamie Dimon grew up among one elder brother named Peter and a fraternal twin brother called Ted. Damie was the youngest of all them.

Wife and Children

Jamie Dimon Family

In the year 1983, Jamie Dimon married Judith Kent. While studying in Harvard Business School Jamie met his wife. The couple is blessed with three daughters namely Julia, Laura, and Kara Leigh. He resides with his family in Upper East Side in Manhattan, United States.

Career

Jamie Dimon Career

Jamie Dimon left American Express in the year 1985 along with Sandy Weill. Thereafter, they took their control over a consumer finance company called Commercial Credit. Dimon became the chief financial officer of the company. In the year 1988, Dimon and Weill established the Citi Group which in subsequent years became the world’s largest financial service provider company.

Jamie Dimon jp Morgan

Jamie Dimon quit Citi Group in November 1998 following some professional disagreements. Jamie became the CEO of Bank One in March 2000. In July 2004, JP Morgan acquired Bank One and Jamie became the President and Chief Operating officer of the combined financial organization. Jamie became the CEO of the company on January 31st ,2005 and he was elected as a the Chairman of the board on 31st December 2006.In addition to this he became Class A board member of Federal Reserve Bank of New York in March 2008. He has a current net worth of US$1.1 billion and earns an annual salary of US$20 million




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